1. 18:38 16th Jul 2014

    Notes: 21349

    Reblogged from postgenderfemmerobot

    'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'
    —  Laverne Cox (via postgenderfemmerobot)

    (Source: angerisbeautiful-79)

     
  2. 18:35

    Notes: 354

    Reblogged from thehoopoe

    Tags: free palestineIsraelPalestinebdsjustice

    WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA

    thehoopoe:

    (This was written by a friend who wishes to remain anonymous. Passing it on as it’s a very useful set of tips)

    I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.

    This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.

    Please share with your communities!

    1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS

    Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.

    Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions: http://www.bdsmovement.net/call

    Divestment:
    Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses.
    Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country. http://sjpnational.org/
    We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments. https://wedivest.org/

    Consumer Boycott:
    Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.
    http://mic.com/articles/81363/9-brands-you-can-boycott-to-hold-israel-accountable-for-its-violation-of-international-law
    Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products.
    There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.

    Cultural and Academic Boycott:
    As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.
    There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to.
    Academic boycott guidelines: http://www.pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=1108
    Cultural boycott guidelines: http://www.pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=1047
    If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work: http://www.boycottisrael.info/

    An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database: http://www.whoprofits.org/

    2. DONATE

    Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:

    Middle East Children’s Alliance: http://www.mecaforpeace.org/
    Palestinian Center for Human Rights: http://www.pchrgaza.org/portal/en/
    American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA): http://www.anera.org/
    United Palestinian Appeal: http://www.helpupa.org/

    3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS

    Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.

    If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.

    For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

    4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS

    This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.

    Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. http://www.usacbi.org/about/

    Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.

    If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.

    5. CHECK YOURSELF

    Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.

    Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:
    Al Jazeera English: http://www.aljazeera.com/
    Ma’an News Agency: http://www.maannews.net/eng/
    The Electronic Intifada: http://electronicintifada.net/
    Jadaliyya: http://www.jadaliyya.com/
    Palestinian Centre for Human Rights: http://www.pchrgaza.org/portal/en/

    Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines)

    Think about what your role is in this movement. Ask yourself some questions before you take action:
    What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
    What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
    Who are you being accountable to?

    Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to.

    Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work.

    Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

    Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.

    6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER

    Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
    Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
    Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
    Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
    Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
    Take time and space to feel.
    Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
    Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
    Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
    Take alone time if you need it.
    Turn to your faith if that helps you.
    Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
    If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
    Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
    Keep checking yourself.
    Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.
    “We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKucPh9xHtM
    “What I Will” by Suheir Hammad : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFbE8RBhSDw

     
  3. 22:53 14th Jul 2014

    Notes: 2369

    Reblogged from realsocialskills

    Nonviolent Communication can hurt people

    realsocialskills:

    People who struggle interpersonally, who seem unhappy, or who get into a lot of conflicts are often advised to adopt the approach of Nonviolent Communication. 

    This is often not a good idea. Nonviolent Communication is an approach based on refraining from seeming to judge others, and instead expressing everything in terms of your own feelings. For instance, instead of “Don’t be such an inconsiderate jerk about leaving your clothes around”, you’d say “When you leave your clothing around, I feel disrespected.”. That approach is useful in situations in which people basically want to treat each other well but have trouble doing so because they don’t understand one another’s needs and feelings. In every other type of situation, the ideology and methodology of Nonviolent Communication can make things much worse.

    Nonviolent Communication can be particularly harmful to marginalized people or abuse survivors. It can also teach powerful people to abuse their power more than they had previously, and to feel good about doing so. Non-Violent Communication has strategies that can be helpful in some situations, but it also teaches a lot of anti-skills that can undermine the ability to survive and fight injustice and abuse.

    For marginalized or abused people, being judgmental is a necessary survival skill. Sometimes it’s not enough to say “when you call me slurs, I feel humiliated” - particularly if the other person doesn’t care about hurting you or actually wants to hurt you. Sometimes you have to say “The word you called me is a slur. It’s not ok to call me slurs. Stop.” Or “If you call me that again, I’m leaving.” Sometimes you have to say to yourself “I’m ok, they’re mean.” All of those things are judgments, and it’s important to be judgmental in those ways.

    You can’t protect yourself from people who mean you harm without judging them. Nonviolent Communication works when people are hurting each other by accident; it only works when everyone means well. It doesn’t have responses that work when people are hurting others on purpose or without caring about damage they do. Which, if you’re marginalized or abused, happens several times a day. NVC does not have a framework for acknowledging this or responding to it.

    In order to protect yourself from people who mean you harm, you have to see yourself as having the right to judge that someone is hurting you. You also have to be able to unilaterally set boundaries, even when your boundaries are upsetting to other people. Nonviolent Communication culture can teach you that whenever others are upset with you, you’re doing something wrong and should change what you do in order to meet the needs of others better. That’s a major anti-skill. People need to be able to decide things for themselves even when others are upset.

    Further, NVC places a dangerous degree of emphasis on using a very specific kind of language and tone. NVC culture often judges people less on the content of what they’re saying than how they are saying it. Abusers and cluelessly powerful people are usually much better at using NVC language than people who are actively being hurt. When you’re just messing with someone’s head or protecting your own right to mess with their head, it’s easy to phrase things correctly. When someone is abusing you and you’re trying to explain what’s wrong, and you’re actively terrified, it’s much, much harder to phrase things in I-statements that take an acceptable tone.

    Further, there is *always* a way to take issue with the way someone phrased something. It’s really easy to make something that’s really about shutting someone up look like a concern about the way they’re using language, or advice on how to communicate better. Every group I’ve seen that valued this type of language highly ended up nitpicking the language of the least popular person in the group as a way of shutting them up. 

    tl;dr Be careful with Nonviolent Communication. It has some merits, but it is not the complete solution to conflict or communication that it presents itself as. If you have certain common problems, NVC is dangerous.

     
  4. 18:14 13th Jul 2014

    Notes: 28591

    Reblogged from ramblingpoetry

    micdotcom:

    16-year-old Jada’s rape was turned into a meme — but she and her supporters are fighting back

    Jada’s case shares an eerie similarity to last year’s Steubenville rape case. That incident, too, involved the assault of a teenage girl, and that case, too, saw photos and videos of the unconscious girl spread like wildfire across the Web.

    But unlike the Steubenville case, to which the reactions ranged from disturbing to downright egregious, Jada’s story is receiving an overwhelming outpouring of support. While the initial purpose of #jadapose was to make a mockery of a young girl’s sexual assault, her supporters have come out in droves to back her.

    Read more | Follow micdotcom

     
  5. 17:52

    Notes: 742

    Reblogged from labrujamorgan

    On Trigger Warnings and the Myth of Community

    labrujamorgan:

    Recently, trans bro Jack Halberstam wrote an article called You Are Triggering me! The Neo-Liberal Rhetoric of Harm, Danger and Trauma. It is rife with crappy Monty Python references and historical inaccuracies. The main thrust of the article is that trigger warnings used by young people creates divisions within queer communities and keeps us from focusing on the real enemies. Jack goes on to say that trans women telling non-trans women to refrain from using the t-slur is censorship and play on politics of respectability and assimilation. That once upon a time in the 90s feminists and queers could take a joke and now one can’t do anything without being called out. The article reads like an adultist treatise that amounts to a glorified “kids these days”. 

    All through out the article is the unspoken assumption of community. Jack operates from the presumption that we all exist in the same community. That we all have the same stake in triggers, in racist/transmisogynist language and actions. Jack assumes that we all have the same level of vulnerability or assume the same amount of risk when the t-slur is thrown around. He labors under the neo-liberal delusion that everyone’s trauma is equal. He says that trigger warnings erode community but we were never in the same community to begin with. 

    I have only heard this line of reasoning from white cis queers, from white trans men and masculine folks. They want us to pipe down so that they can speak for us (us being trans women of color) and exploit our labor, our lives and our deaths so that they can justify their assimilation. Because if being a tenured professor isn’t assimilation, I don’t know what is. Folks like Jack don’t really care about community until someone tells them to stop and than suddenly they cry that we are all one community and why aren’t we talking about the real problems? Never mind the racist/transmisogynist behavior in the first place.  

    But people like Jack are the problem. Language and ideas are the basis for violence, both structural and interpersonal. The t-slur is used to dehumanize trans women, specifically trans women in the sex trades, and is justification for our murder. The caricatures of trans women in the media dehumanize us and justify our murder. The way Jack frames the problem as trans women being divisive by telling non-trans women to stop using the t-slur shifts the focus off the people who are actually being oppressive, namely Jack. People in power are never seen as divisive, its those in the bottom who tell them no. 

    Jack argues that trigger warnings put an overemphasis on individual safety and not systemic causes, but this isn’t a zero sum game. We can both be conscious of people’s needs for safety and be aware of systemic oppression. Trigger warnings also don’t stop the triggering material from existing. It gives a pause to mentally prepare oneself. And that warning can facilitate someone being able to have a deeper engagement with the material because they were prepared. Jack says that trigger warnings perpetrate this individualistic notion of trauma and leads to what is called “oppression Olympics”. But its only white queers who want to silence people of color and trans women who ever use this argument. 

    In the end, people who complain about trigger warnings or about not being able to say certain words are selfish. They care more about themselves than building community or trying to dismantle systems of oppression. Because you can’t build community with people whose neck is under your boot. You can’t dismantle oppression by doing the same exact things that oppressors do. 

     
  6. 23:53 6th Jul 2014

    Notes: 4326

    Reblogged from medievalpoc

    image: Download

    medievalpoc:

Toni Morrison
[“The function, the very serious function of racism, is distraction. It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and over again, your reason for being. Somebody says you have no language, so you spend twenty years proving that you do. Somebody says your head isn’t shaped properly, so you have scientists working on the fact that it is. Someone says you have no art, so you dredge that up. Somebody says you have no kingdoms, so you dredge that up. None of that is necessary. There will always be one more thing.” -Toni Morrison]
Wow. I swear, every time Toni Morrison opens her mouth, truth that cuts to the core falls out.
This quote resonates with me because so much of what I want to happen here has to do with removing a lot of the racist assumption about history in so that others can just get on with it. Even if you don’t like what I write, the images, links, books, and resources are still here to link to, rather than constantly being bombarded with and distracted by demands for “education”, “proof” that racism exists, or anything else anyone might need it for.
Whether you’re writing, making visual art, working in education, or just trying to have a conversation, it’s my hope that this blog might help remove some of the distractions of racism as defined above, and do your thing.

    medievalpoc:

    Toni Morrison

    [“The function, the very serious function of racism, is distraction. It keeps you from doing your work. It keeps you explaining, over and over again, your reason for being. Somebody says you have no language, so you spend twenty years proving that you do. Somebody says your head isn’t shaped properly, so you have scientists working on the fact that it is. Someone says you have no art, so you dredge that up. Somebody says you have no kingdoms, so you dredge that up. None of that is necessary. There will always be one more thing.” -Toni Morrison]

    Wow. I swear, every time Toni Morrison opens her mouth, truth that cuts to the core falls out.

    This quote resonates with me because so much of what I want to happen here has to do with removing a lot of the racist assumption about history in so that others can just get on with it. Even if you don’t like what I write, the images, links, books, and resources are still here to link to, rather than constantly being bombarded with and distracted by demands for “education”, “proof” that racism exists, or anything else anyone might need it for.

    Whether you’re writing, making visual art, working in education, or just trying to have a conversation, it’s my hope that this blog might help remove some of the distractions of racism as defined above, and do your thing.

     
  7. 08:11 21st Jun 2014

    Notes: 168762

    Reblogged from indigomountian

    catherineandlanalover:

    allonsyforever:

    artsmermaid:

    ITS A POST!!!!!! WHY HAVENT I SEEN THIS IN POST FORM BEFORE!!!!

    David Tennant keeping a straight face in this scene is the best acting that has ever happened in history and no one can convince me otherwise

    THIS IS THE BESTTTT BLOODYYYY SKETCH IN THE HISTORYYY OF COMIC TELEVISIONNN!!!!

    (Source: fadingfaye)

     
  8. 08:09

    Notes: 206753

    Reblogged from indigomountian

    borderlineotaku:

whatalansays:

blackcaliente:

i guess you could call this
a moist owlet

…I’m so done with this site.

It’s such an aggressive and in your face water dance

    borderlineotaku:

    whatalansays:

    blackcaliente:

    i guess you could call this

    a moist owlet

    …I’m so done with this site.

    It’s such an aggressive and in your face water dance

     
  9. 08:00

    Notes: 173499

    Reblogged from indigomountian

    hot4triangle:

    when i saw this i assumed theyd pranked the guy by changing his actual physical reflection into mr.bean and it didnt occur to me for like another good minute afterward to question how that might have happened

    (Source: tastefullyoffensive)

     
  10. 22:26 19th Jun 2014

    Notes: 228085

    Reblogged from lisaquestions

    lisaquestions:

    jamesgf:

    tairupanda:

    derschneefiel:

    The Pallas´s Cat, also called Manul, is a small wildcat living in the grasslands and steppe of central asia.
    It is named after the german naturalist Peter Simon Pallas, who first described the species in 1776.

    That is the most expressive and gelatinous cat I have ever seen.

    That fifth picture

     
  11. 
    I’m watching Belle





    
    
        Check-in to
    
    
    Belle on tvtag
     
  12. 12:55 11th Jun 2014

    Notes: 220329

    Reblogged from doeandthestag

    briandanielwolf:

    In 2010, there were 8 school shootings in the US.

    In 2011, there were 10.

    In 2012, there were 14.

    In 2013? 28.

    In the first half of 2014 alone, we have already suffered 38 school shootings. 

    If that doesn’t horrify you, then I don’t know what would.

    Damn

     
  13. 12:54

    Notes: 944774

    Reblogged from carnivaloftherandom

    karnythia:

    note-a-bear:

    mxydxy:

    iraffiruse:

    The Quokka

    HE POSED FOR A FUCKKJNG SELFIIWE I CANT RIGHT NOWE

    LITERALLY EVERY TIME
    I WILL ALWAYS REBLOG QUOKKAS

    I need one

     
  14. 21:10 31st May 2014

    Notes: 317881

    Reblogged from lisaquestions

    lisaquestions:

cishaming:

twistedkate:

iamcoollikebowtiesandfezzes:

waiting-for-gallifrey:

kaorijoy:

hexcodewhite:

princess-potterheadxo:

did she get a haircut

does it make anyone else uncomfortable that they changed her entire race because she went out with Ron in their sixth year
isn’t that what happened???
they changed a character’s entire race because she as a character became important and relevant for a short amount of time

Wow.

Umm, no. They did not change her entire race simply because she dated Ron. Actually think about it. Up until the sixth book, she was a background character that was only ever mentioned in passing, so she wasn’t given a physical description. Then in the sixth book, Lavender was finally described, as having ‘pale skin and dirty blonde hair’. Well, the first few Harry Potter movies came out before the Half-Blood Prince book did, so the casting directors did what they wanted with the character. 
Another thing, the Lavender Brown from the first few movies only appeared in the first few movies. Lavender didn’t even appear in the 4th and 5th movies, because again, she was a background character, and wasn’t vital to the story. The only reason her race was changed was because a physical description was finally in the books, and it didn’t fit what the directors had, so they had to recast her. It was not because she dated Ron.

People need to stop yelling racism at every little thing…

Pretty sure people need to stop being racist first sorry not sorry

Lavender was never described in the books. Racists making shit up.

Whatever the book said (and I don’t recall a description either) getting a white actress to replace a black actress is racist and shouldn’t happen. It’s not as if her skin color was a vitally important plot element that required her to be white when she dated Ron.

    lisaquestions:

    cishaming:

    twistedkate:

    iamcoollikebowtiesandfezzes:

    waiting-for-gallifrey:

    kaorijoy:

    hexcodewhite:

    princess-potterheadxo:

    did she get a haircut

    does it make anyone else uncomfortable that they changed her entire race because she went out with Ron in their sixth year

    isn’t that what happened???

    they changed a character’s entire race because she as a character became important and relevant for a short amount of time

    Wow.

    Umm, no. They did not change her entire race simply because she dated Ron. Actually think about it. Up until the sixth book, she was a background character that was only ever mentioned in passing, so she wasn’t given a physical description. Then in the sixth book, Lavender was finally described, as having ‘pale skin and dirty blonde hair’. Well, the first few Harry Potter movies came out before the Half-Blood Prince book did, so the casting directors did what they wanted with the character. 

    Another thing, the Lavender Brown from the first few movies only appeared in the first few movies. Lavender didn’t even appear in the 4th and 5th movies, because again, she was a background character, and wasn’t vital to the story. The only reason her race was changed was because a physical description was finally in the books, and it didn’t fit what the directors had, so they had to recast her. It was not because she dated Ron.

    People need to stop yelling racism at every little thing…

    Pretty sure people need to stop being racist first sorry not sorry

    Lavender was never described in the books. Racists making shit up.

    Whatever the book said (and I don’t recall a description either) getting a white actress to replace a black actress is racist and shouldn’t happen. It’s not as if her skin color was a vitally important plot element that required her to be white when she dated Ron.

    (Source: jaimelarnnister)

     
  15. 20:58

    Notes: 65844

    Reblogged from skeptikhaleesi

    onespecialnigga:

missinglinc:

tastefullyoffensive:

I like their style. [x]

The kind of business I wanna run.

aaayyyy

    onespecialnigga:

    missinglinc:

    tastefullyoffensive:

    I like their style. [x]

    The kind of business I wanna run.

    aaayyyy