1. 09:01 1st Sep 2014

    Notes: 32633

    Reblogged from fuckyeahlavernecox

    image: Download

     
  2. 08:50

    Notes: 60530

    Reblogged from fuckyeahlavernecox

    Laverne Cox stanning for Beyoncé at the VMAs

    (Source: beyonseh)

     
  3. 12:39 20th Aug 2014

    Notes: 7789

    Reblogged from findanewequation

    findanewequation:

    So for the last four months or so, I have taken part in the body positivity movement on Instagram, including posting photos of myself in my bikini and underwear/bra. Keep in mind that none of my photos have ever been sexually explicit or suggestive and that I have always been fully covered. As far…

     
  4. 12:58 14th Aug 2014

    Notes: 6768

    Reblogged from navigatethestream

    navigatethestream:

    i haven’t had much to say about what’s been going on in Ferguson but I will say this much.

    I know some of y’all are invested in the work that Anonymous does but please tread lightly.

    Anonymous has declared today a “National Day of Rage” at the same time the National Moment of Silence vigils…

     
  5. 18:53 10th Aug 2014

    Notes: 6465

    Reblogged from dion-thesocialist

    blacksupervillain:

    cops expect us to believe the dumbest shit

    I’m supposed to believe a black kid ran up to a police officer and tried to take their gun?

    like last year I was supposed to believe a handcuffed black man shot himself in the head in the back of a police car?

    ok

     
  6. (Trans)Misogyny on BBC Woman’s Hour

    I clean houses these days.  For an eco focused company who pays me decent.  It’s not a bad gig.  We’re allowed to listen to stuff with headphones while we work, and podcasts have been the perfect thing for me.  If I tune out for a second, unlike with an audiobook, I don’t really lose my place.  And I don’t have the temptation to sing along, like with music (we’re not allowed to).  So I’ve been devouring podcasts! The one I’ve listened to the longest, in fact, for many years now off and on, is “Woman’s Hour” on BBC Radio 4.  This is basically a one hour show, five days a week, that takes a feminist look at current events, primarily in the UK but they do draw stories from around the world.  The topics are as diverse as anyone who has spent time in Women’s Studies or the like might expect.

    From my perspective this show is not perfect, but it’s often interesting.  Much like NPR in the States, Radio 4 seems to be a moderately left-leaning liberal type of environment, and Woman’s Hour generally takes a similarly liberal feminist or old school radical feminist perspective on most things.  So, obviously, coming from an anti-kyriarchal feminist perspective I often want to respond with “yeah…but” to their segments.  From the way FGM and hijab are addressed, or the way they interview sex workers and trans women I can tell there is a deep discomfort with things I take for granted as obvious (like that sex work is work and trans women are women, full stop). I don’t love this, but I can live with it most days.  Honestly it’s often a good reminder about what big F Feminism looks like and values, and clarifies my fundamental differences with them.

    But the episode I listened to on Friday was a whole new level.  I actually started crying while I cleaned I was so upset and angry, and I had to turn it off at one point.  Once the episode was over I cleaned in silence for a while just to clear my head.

    Read More

     
  7.  
  8. 21:53

    Notes: 29

    Reblogged from lisaquestions

    lisaquestions:

    cishaming:

    ikillnazis:

    cishaming:

    ikillnazis:

    cishaming:

    ikillnazis:

    Every person I have seen so far in Oregon has been a balding man.

    That’s it. That’s Oregon. Thanks for coming.

    I’m not even to Eugene yet

    I went to Oregon once with my grandparents. Talk about boring.

    there’s nothing to do til you hit portland tbh

    Not to mention Portland’s Portland, so what’s the point?

    lol. I hope you have fun tho?

    Hey now! Portland has Powell’s Books. And I think Voodoo Donuts?

    Sadly, Esparza’s is gone so that’s like half the appeal right there.

    When I was a kid we would drive up from N. Cal to go camping on the Oregon coast.  That was the nice.

    (Source: transsnake)

     
  9. 21:50

    Notes: 4640

    Reblogged from howtobeterrell

    artblackafrica:

    Nigerian artist Joseph Eze’s (b.1979) portrait series deals with the intersection between Nigeria’s politics and the female body. Click the images for the title and date

     
  10. 15:13

    Notes: 1

    image: Download

    Kitty decided he had to be under my chin even though there really isn’t room

    Kitty decided he had to be under my chin even though there really isn’t room

     
  11. 18:22 28th Jul 2014

    Notes: 1

    image: Download

    Hair moment

    Hair moment

     
  12. 20:22 24th Jul 2014

    Notes: 2575

    Reblogged from punwitch

    image: Download

    note-a-bear:

slimgoodymakeba:

lovefromjea:

blood—sport:

sinidentidades:

Emails reveal Michigan prisoners regularly served maggot-ridden food, forced to engage in sexual acts for food
Seven months after hiring an outside contractor to feed prisoners in state prisons, Michigan officials are considering scrapping the contract over serious problems ranging from maggots in the food to private contract employees abusing and having sex with prisoners.
According to emails acquired by the Detroit Free Press under the Michigan’s Freedom of Information Act, state officials are at their “wit’s end,” over the complete failure of the Aramark Correctional Services of Philadelphia to control their employees and fulfill the terms of their contract.
In an attempt to save $12 million annually, Michigan outsourced food services to Aramark starting in January of this year, only to receive reports of maggots in the food, unclean kitchens,  food shortages causing increased tensions with the prisoners, as well as Aramark employees smuggling in contraband and assaulting inmates.
One Aramark food service director showed up for work drunk and failed a Breathalyzer test while another was caught trying to smuggle marijuana into the prison.
“I’m at my wit’s end,” Kevin Weissenborn, the Michigan Department of Corrections manager in charge of overseeing Aramark’s contract, wrote to one prison warden in March.
“I know how you feel,” replied Warden Heidi Washington of the Charles E. Egeler Reception & Guidance Center in Jackson. “At first I felt like Lansing thought I was just being too difficult and too demanding because I was always complaining. However, I think everyone knows that’s not the case.”
Although Aramark only employs 300 workers in Michigan’s prisons, 74 Aramark workers have been banned from prison property for various infractions in just six months.
Aramark was fined $98,000 in March for repeated contract violations such as running out of food and making improper substitutions for required menu items.
Gov. Rick Snyder (R) is now considering scrapping the $145-million, three-year contract before the summer heat intensifies, worried over prison unrest.
After reading reports of maggots in the food at two prisons, Michigan Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardvill (R-Monroe) called for new bids from other companies.
“It doesn’t matter if they’re prisoners or who they are, people don’t deserve that type of treatment,” Richardville said.
Aramark officials have released a statement claiming they believe many of the complaints stem from prison officials unhappy with outsourcing jobs at the expense of state Corrections Department workers.

THIS IS THE SAME CATERER WE PAY $2000 A SEMESTER FOR!!!!! At University of Texas at Arlington.


People think for some reason that private companies are the way to go. 

like…I legit cannot even wrap my head around the level of evil necessary for this

    note-a-bear:

    slimgoodymakeba:

    lovefromjea:

    blood—sport:

    sinidentidades:

    Emails reveal Michigan prisoners regularly served maggot-ridden food, forced to engage in sexual acts for food

    Seven months after hiring an outside contractor to feed prisoners in state prisons, Michigan officials are considering scrapping the contract over serious problems ranging from maggots in the food to private contract employees abusing and having sex with prisoners.

    According to emails acquired by the Detroit Free Press under the Michigan’s Freedom of Information Act, state officials are at their “wit’s end,” over the complete failure of the Aramark Correctional Services of Philadelphia to control their employees and fulfill the terms of their contract.

    In an attempt to save $12 million annually, Michigan outsourced food services to Aramark starting in January of this year, only to receive reports of maggots in the food, unclean kitchens,  food shortages causing increased tensions with the prisoners, as well as Aramark employees smuggling in contraband and assaulting inmates.

    One Aramark food service director showed up for work drunk and failed a Breathalyzer test while another was caught trying to smuggle marijuana into the prison.

    “I’m at my wit’s end,” Kevin Weissenborn, the Michigan Department of Corrections manager in charge of overseeing Aramark’s contract, wrote to one prison warden in March.

    “I know how you feel,” replied Warden Heidi Washington of the Charles E. Egeler Reception & Guidance Center in Jackson. “At first I felt like Lansing thought I was just being too difficult and too demanding because I was always complaining. However, I think everyone knows that’s not the case.”

    Although Aramark only employs 300 workers in Michigan’s prisons, 74 Aramark workers have been banned from prison property for various infractions in just six months.

    Aramark was fined $98,000 in March for repeated contract violations such as running out of food and making improper substitutions for required menu items.

    Gov. Rick Snyder (R) is now considering scrapping the $145-million, three-year contract before the summer heat intensifies, worried over prison unrest.

    After reading reports of maggots in the food at two prisons, Michigan Senate Majority Leader Randy Richardvill (R-Monroe) called for new bids from other companies.

    “It doesn’t matter if they’re prisoners or who they are, people don’t deserve that type of treatment,” Richardville said.

    Aramark officials have released a statement claiming they believe many of the complaints stem from prison officials unhappy with outsourcing jobs at the expense of state Corrections Department workers.

    THIS IS THE SAME CATERER WE PAY $2000 A SEMESTER FOR!!!!! At University of Texas at Arlington.

    People think for some reason that private companies are the way to go. 

    like…I legit cannot even wrap my head around the level of evil necessary for this

     
  13. 18:38 16th Jul 2014

    Notes: 28517

    Reblogged from postgenderfemmerobot

    'Just because I got an Emmy nomination doesn't mean the lives of trans people aren't in peril every day.'
    —  Laverne Cox (via postgenderfemmerobot)

    (Source: angerisbeautiful-79)

     
  14. 18:35

    Notes: 386

    Reblogged from thehoopoe

    Tags: free palestineIsraelPalestinebdsjustice

    WHAT TO DO ABOUT GAZA

    thehoopoe:

    (This was written by a friend who wishes to remain anonymous. Passing it on as it’s a very useful set of tips)

    I have seen a lot of people in my life, myself included, going through hard times right now with the extreme escalation of colonial violence in Palestine. People are sad, angry, and praying. Many people are overwhelmed. Worried for our families. Many people in our communities are learning more about Palestine for the first time, and want to know ways to connect. It’s hard to know what to do from so far away, and easy to feel helpless when you don’t know what to do.

    This list is for all of us, to recommit to the work we’ve been doing, to get grounded when this massacre has knocked us off our feet, and to get connected where we haven’t been before.

    Please share with your communities!

    1. BDS – BOYCOTT, DIVESTMENT, & SANCTIONS

    Boycott, divestment, and sanctions (BDS) is a movement that was called for by Palestinian civil society. It is a grassroots, nonviolent form of resistance that there are so many ways to participate in.

    Here is the Palestinian Civil Society Call for Boycott, Divestment, and Sanctions: http://www.bdsmovement.net/call

    Divestment:
    Get involved with (or start) a campaign for your university, workplace, union, etc. to pull out its investments in companies that are connected to Israeli human rights offenses.
    Students for Justice in Palestine (SJP) has led many successful divestment campaigns at universities across the country. http://sjpnational.org/
    We Divest is a project of Jewish Voice for Peace, which has successfully pressured TIAA-CREF around its occupation investments. https://wedivest.org/

    Consumer Boycott:
    Here is a quick list of companies that profit from Israeli human rights offenses.
    http://mic.com/articles/81363/9-brands-you-can-boycott-to-hold-israel-accountable-for-its-violation-of-international-law
    Consumer boycott is about individually deciding not to buy these products, but it’s also about popular education. Flyering to educate people about what’s behind this stuff. Encouraging local shops not to sell these products.
    There are ongoing successful consumer boycott campaigns against SodaStream and Sabra Hummus, for example.

    Cultural and Academic Boycott:
    As artists and academics, it’s very important that we decolonize the way we produce our work, and don’t let it be used to normalize violent structures.
    There is a set of guidelines for cultural and academic boycott from the Palestinian Campaign for the Academic and Cultural Boycott of Israel (PACBI) that artists and academics can sign on to.
    Academic boycott guidelines: http://www.pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=1108
    Cultural boycott guidelines: http://www.pacbi.org/etemplate.php?id=1047
    If you are an Israeli citizen, you can also sign the Boycott from Within statement, and get involved with their work: http://www.boycottisrael.info/

    An excellent resource, which can help you find information for whichever kind of BDS campaign you decide to get involved with, is the Who Profits? database: http://www.whoprofits.org/

    2. DONATE

    Donating money is not an action that everyone can afford to get involved with, but if you have even a small amount to spare, here are some great places to donate to:

    Middle East Children’s Alliance: http://www.mecaforpeace.org/
    Palestinian Center for Human Rights: http://www.pchrgaza.org/portal/en/
    American Near East Refugee Aid (ANERA): http://www.anera.org/
    United Palestinian Appeal: http://www.helpupa.org/

    3. PARTICIPATE IN LOCAL PROTESTS & VIGILS

    Protests and vigils are a great way to make the Palestinian struggle visible in your city, and also to build community with other people who are feeling the same way you are.

    If you go to a protest, come through with good friends that you can trust, and have a plan for what to do if police or counterprotestors escalate.

    For organizers: Palestinian liberation is connected so intricately with all of our liberation. Reach out to members of other oppressed communities and build coalitions, feature their voices at your demonstration (for example, African, Latin@, and Indigenous activists). Keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

    4. MAKE ART! & SUPPORT ARTISTS

    This is giving us a whole lot of feelings, right?! Write/draw/paint/act/sing/print/dance it out! Bring attention to Gaza and Palestine within your artistic communities.

    Endorse the USACBI statement, commit to its principles. Educate other artists you know about it, and encourage them to sign as well. http://www.usacbi.org/about/

    Tell your story and tell it true. Be ethical and accountable in the way you handle the stories of others.

    If you are not an artist: Help support Palestinian artists, and artists from other communities in struggle against Israeli apartheid. Donate, purchase work, host events, for example.

    5. CHECK YOURSELF

    Make sure that the information you have is accurate. Behind every single news story is a human being with a life as full as your own, and you owe it to them to get the facts straight. Do not re-post gory images of dead children on social media with no context—this is extremely disrespectful.

    Below are a few (but not the only) reliable English-language news sources:
    Al Jazeera English: http://www.aljazeera.com/
    Ma’an News Agency: http://www.maannews.net/eng/
    The Electronic Intifada: http://electronicintifada.net/
    Jadaliyya: http://www.jadaliyya.com/
    Palestinian Centre for Human Rights: http://www.pchrgaza.org/portal/en/

    Read and understand the BDS call, and its demands and guidelines, and do not present false information about it. This is very important, because oftentimes even people who are part of the Palestine solidarity movement can misunderstand the guidelines, and fall for Zionist misinformation about them. Read the calls for yourself and figure out how you can plug in. (see above for the guidelines)

    Think about what your role is in this movement. Ask yourself some questions before you take action:
    What is your relationship to Israeli apartheid historically, and the recent colonial violence?
    What are you directly complicit in and what can you do to address that?
    Who are you being accountable to?

    Amplify the voices of, and support people who are more directly impacted than you. Step back when you need to and when you are told to.

    Avoid false and oppressive binaries, like Arab/Jew. Remember that Israeli apartheid is a multi-layered system, and bring that understanding to your work.

    Think about your social position in the country where you’re doing this work, and consistently check yourself on this, too. Again, keep racial, gender, and disability justice as the foundations of your work.

    Don’t judge people for not being able to take part in the same forms of resistance as you.

    6. TAKE CARE OF YOURSELF & EACH OTHER

    Mourn the dead. Speak their names. Publicly and privately. Do rituals if this helps you.
    Read/watch/listen to/share poems/music/film/art by Palestinian artists.
    Make art. (even if you are not “an artist.”)
    Write it out. (even if you are not “a writer.”)
    Cook Palestinian food. Share it with your loved ones.
    Take time and space to feel.
    Lean on your friends and let them lean on you.
    Tune out the news if you need to. (Keep the news on, if you need to be reassured by the steady flow of information.)
    Don’t go to protests/demos/events alone.
    Take alone time if you need it.
    Turn to your faith if that helps you.
    Stay committed to healing, and recognize healing as part of the work.
    If you are close with them, stay in touch with your family and friends in Palestine.
    Remember, it is not your responsibility to educate your oppressors!
    Keep checking yourself.
    Affirm life. Affirm life. Affirm life.
    “We teach life, sir” by Rafeef Ziadah : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=aKucPh9xHtM
    “What I Will” by Suheir Hammad : https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LFbE8RBhSDw

     
  15. 22:53 14th Jul 2014

    Notes: 2785

    Reblogged from realsocialskills

    Nonviolent Communication can hurt people

    realsocialskills:

    People who struggle interpersonally, who seem unhappy, or who get into a lot of conflicts are often advised to adopt the approach of Nonviolent Communication. 

    This is often not a good idea. Nonviolent Communication is an approach based on refraining from seeming to judge others, and instead expressing everything in terms of your own feelings. For instance, instead of “Don’t be such an inconsiderate jerk about leaving your clothes around”, you’d say “When you leave your clothing around, I feel disrespected.”. That approach is useful in situations in which people basically want to treat each other well but have trouble doing so because they don’t understand one another’s needs and feelings. In every other type of situation, the ideology and methodology of Nonviolent Communication can make things much worse.

    Nonviolent Communication can be particularly harmful to marginalized people or abuse survivors. It can also teach powerful people to abuse their power more than they had previously, and to feel good about doing so. Non-Violent Communication has strategies that can be helpful in some situations, but it also teaches a lot of anti-skills that can undermine the ability to survive and fight injustice and abuse.

    For marginalized or abused people, being judgmental is a necessary survival skill. Sometimes it’s not enough to say “when you call me slurs, I feel humiliated” - particularly if the other person doesn’t care about hurting you or actually wants to hurt you. Sometimes you have to say “The word you called me is a slur. It’s not ok to call me slurs. Stop.” Or “If you call me that again, I’m leaving.” Sometimes you have to say to yourself “I’m ok, they’re mean.” All of those things are judgments, and it’s important to be judgmental in those ways.

    You can’t protect yourself from people who mean you harm without judging them. Nonviolent Communication works when people are hurting each other by accident; it only works when everyone means well. It doesn’t have responses that work when people are hurting others on purpose or without caring about damage they do. Which, if you’re marginalized or abused, happens several times a day. NVC does not have a framework for acknowledging this or responding to it.

    In order to protect yourself from people who mean you harm, you have to see yourself as having the right to judge that someone is hurting you. You also have to be able to unilaterally set boundaries, even when your boundaries are upsetting to other people. Nonviolent Communication culture can teach you that whenever others are upset with you, you’re doing something wrong and should change what you do in order to meet the needs of others better. That’s a major anti-skill. People need to be able to decide things for themselves even when others are upset.

    Further, NVC places a dangerous degree of emphasis on using a very specific kind of language and tone. NVC culture often judges people less on the content of what they’re saying than how they are saying it. Abusers and cluelessly powerful people are usually much better at using NVC language than people who are actively being hurt. When you’re just messing with someone’s head or protecting your own right to mess with their head, it’s easy to phrase things correctly. When someone is abusing you and you’re trying to explain what’s wrong, and you’re actively terrified, it’s much, much harder to phrase things in I-statements that take an acceptable tone.

    Further, there is *always* a way to take issue with the way someone phrased something. It’s really easy to make something that’s really about shutting someone up look like a concern about the way they’re using language, or advice on how to communicate better. Every group I’ve seen that valued this type of language highly ended up nitpicking the language of the least popular person in the group as a way of shutting them up. 

    tl;dr Be careful with Nonviolent Communication. It has some merits, but it is not the complete solution to conflict or communication that it presents itself as. If you have certain common problems, NVC is dangerous.